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Rights and Accommodations

As an adult with a learning disability, it’s crucial to understand your legal rights in order to advocate for yourself in college or on the job. For instance, did you know that a prospective employer is not allowed to ask if you have a disability during an interview? Or perhaps you’re eligible for accommodations that will take your skills to the next level—but you won’t know until you get the facts.

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Rights and Accommodations



Legal Rights and Accommodations for Adults with LD

Disabilities Act - Disabilities Laws

Laws That Protect You

There are three main federal laws that protect people with learning disabilities from discrimination:

 

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On-the-Job Accommodations

Job Accomodation - Workplace RightsAs a person with learning disabilities, you are entitled to reasonable accommodations at work. A reasonable accommodation is any change or adjustment to a job, your work environment, or the way things are usually done that allows you to perform job functions. In other words, an accommodation can remove or lessen the barriers to your job performance that are caused by your disability. There are three things you must do to get accommodations on the job:

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Job Accommodations for People With Learning Disabilities

Job Accommodations - People with LDThe term “reasonable accommodation” refers to changes in the work place that enable people with disabilities to effectively perform the tasks associated with their job. Accommodations can help people with learning disabilities do their work well, even when their disability makes the work difficult. Accommodations can include variations in: work space and equipment needed to do the task; communication of the work; the tasks themselves; and the time and place that the work is done.

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Requesting Accommodations on the Job

Americans Disabilities Act - ADA Accommodation If you want to request accommodations at work, you will first need to decide whether to disclose your disability. You may be concerned that by disclosing your LD your boss will lose confidence in your ability or that your co-workers will ridicule you. However, you should know that more people today are familiar with learning disabilities than ever before, and LD on the job has become more prevalent and generally accepted. But it is completely up to you whether or not to disclose, and it depends on your comfort level with your boss and your co-workers. If you decide to tell your boss about your LD and need for accommodations, this information must be kept confidential. Your co-workers are not entitled to know about your disability unless you choose to tell them.

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