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NCLD and 30 Education Organizations Release Student Data Principles

Written by Meghan Casey, Policy Research & Advocacy Associate | March 16, 2015

Today, NCLD joins with 31 other education organizations in support of new Student Data Principles. These principles create a framework for educational institutions and anyone who has access to students’ personal information to safeguard that data. Student data may include student attendance, demographics, college-readiness scores, student growth data, and other information.

Since the Fall of 2014, NCLD has been working closely with a diverse coalition of national education organizations – including Data Quality Campaign, Consortium for School Networking, Foundation for Excellence in Education, iNACOL, and National Association of State Boards of Education – to discuss the issues around student data and address the needs of students and parents. The principles developed through this process represent our beliefs about how students’ personal information should be used and protected at all levels of the education system.

James Wendorf, Executive Director of NCLD stated: “The National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) is proud to support these principles for safeguarding student data and believes they are a step toward ensuring that student data is used appropriately in the furtherance of student success. Student achievement data is invaluable to student success: it informs instruction; offers parents and educators insight into the strengths and challenges of students; and allows the personalization of learning for each student. Equally important, however, is the security of this data. Parents must be informed about the type of data being collected, how data is being protected, and what recourse is available should a violation of a child’s privacy occur. Parents are an integral part of every child’s education and must be a partner in the collection and protection of student data.”

These principles create a framework to guide conversations about data and privacy among the field. Wherever data is collected, parents must be informed and must have access to that data. Ultimately, we hope to encourage the use of quality data to inform instruction and foster continuous growth for all students.

To learn more about the principles, the other 31 organizations involved, and the importance of protecting data, visit the Student Data Principles website.

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