A- A A+

Bullying

Children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities are particularly susceptible to bullying, whether it’s physical, verbal, or digital bullying. The impact of bullying can be devastating, and it’s everyone’s responsibility—the bully’s, the victim’s, the bystander’s—to make sure that bullying stops. Learn more about what you can do as a parent.

on-bullying-child-alone

Bullying



Your Stories About Bullying

your-stories-about-bullying-girl-being-laughed-at We asked you—our NCLD community—to tell us about your experiences with bullying. Your responses reflected the sadness, anxiety, anger and vulnerability that are part of the bullying experience. And the heartbreak is all the more poignant when it involves children who are isolated and victimized because of their learning disabilities. Remember that bullying is a choice, not an inescapable reality, and we can (and must!) work together to stop bullying.

Continue Reading

Print

Bullying Hurts Everyone, Not Just the Victim

On Bullying - Parents And Bullying  At first, the word “bullying” conjures up images of a tough, wise-cracking kid verbally taunting and embarrassing another, pushing, punching, poking, tripping, threatening, taking his possessions, ripping his clothes, defacing his property…all behaviors that are clearly inappropriate and that demand immediate adult intervention. But what about the child who because of her small stature and difficulties with expressive language, is rejected by peers when she tries to sit next to them on the school bus and taunted when she tries to join in a conversation? Or the student who is fearful of walking through the hallways in school because of the dozens of times (by any number of peers) he has been shoved, face first, into a locker or had his backpack yanked off his body causing him to fall backwards (sometimes on the staircase!) resulting in his being late for class, not to mention the physical and emotional pain he’s had to endure.

Continue Reading

Print