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Common Core State Standards

What are Common Core State Standards, and how do they affect your child’s education? This states-led initiative attempts to create a cohesive measuring stick for assessing students’ success in reading and math. This means that for the first time in U.S. history, achievement scores will be comparable between states—and students with LD will be held to the same standard. Learn more from this video on Common Core State Standards.

Common Core Standards

Common Core State Standards




What Are Common Core State Standards?

What Are Common Core State StandardsAs the debate over education reform continues in the United States, you’ve probably heard about the Common Core State Standards initiative. What is it exactly, and how will it affect your child’s education? In this introduction to Common Core State Standards (CCSS), we’ll cover the basics of the initiative—including which states have adopted CCSS, how it will be implemented in your child’s school, why we’re in favor of CCSS, and what we still don’t know about CCSS—as well as its possible implications for students who receive special education services.

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A Special Educator Shares Her Perspective on the Common Core State Standards

A Special Educator Shares Her Perpective on the Common Core State Standards The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) creates high expectations for student success by outlining the set of skills that students need to master at each grade level. At the end of the day, students are supposed to be equipped with critical thinking, problem solving and other career-oriented skills for college and 21st century jobs. Although the implementation of the Standards will have a big impact on students with disabilities, the authors of the Standards have provided only limited guidance in this area.

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What Are the Benefits of Standards-Based IEPs?

Standards Based IEP Benefits - Common CoreThe Individualized Education Program (IEP) is the key contract and plan for every student who receives special education services. But not all IEPs are created equal. Over the last decade, the IEP has been evolving. Some states now use a standards-based IEP, which is clearly linked to the grade-level curriculum and expectations for all students, per the state academic content standards. The standards serve as a framework for teaching and telling teachers what to teach but not how to teach it. Some states have complex standards for each grade level, while other states have less specific requirements. With the 2013–14 introduction of Common Core Standards, most states will follow the same set of academic content standards for math and English language arts.

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What Do the Common Core State Standards and Tests Look Like?

Common Core State Standards - TestsAs public schools in 45 of the nation’s states and the District of Columbia gear up to implement the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), parents in participating states may want to learn more about the new standards as well as the annual assessments (tests) that will measure student progress. The Common Core State Standards Initiative assures that the new standards have been carefully designed to improve the quality of K–12 education and to better prepare students for college and career. They also claim the new standards are evidence-based, realistic, and practical.

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Common Core Perspective: The Positive Impact for Kids With LD

Common Core Perspective | Positive Impact for Kids With LDEditor’s Note: As part of our coverage of the Common Core State Standards, we’re inviting organizations and individuals to write guest articles on what the standards mean for schools and students. This article is written by Candace Cortiella, the Director of The Advocacy Institute; it originally appeared on the Smart Kids With Learning Disabilities website.

In June 2010, the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were released. For the first time, this provided states with common standards for all students in English/language arts and Mathematics. The CCSS for grades K-12 were developed in collaboration with a variety of stakeholders, including content experts, state education officials, teachers, school administrators, and parents. To date, 45 states have adopted them.

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Common Core Perspective: A Teacher's Thoughts on Testing

Common Core Perspective | A Teacher's Thoughts on TestingEditor's Note: As part of our coverage of the Common Core State Standards, we’re inviting organizations and individuals to write guest articles on what the standards mean for schools and students. This article is written by Mark Fusco, a high school teacher in the Bronx, New York City.

I had heard rumblings about it for years. I’d read editorials hailing it as a great savior or damning it as a great Satan. I’d been to workshops where the easily excitable facilitator warned, “things are about to change.” Yet it wasn’t until this July—when New York gave its first set of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) tests—that it all got real.

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Common Core Perspective: Making Progress for All Students

Common Core Perspective | Making Progress for All StudentsEditor's Note: As part of our coverage of the Common Core State Standards, we’re inviting organizations and individuals to write guest articles on what the standards mean for schools and students. This article is written by Sonja Brookins Santelises, vice president for K-12 policy and practice at The Education Trust, a leading education advocacy group.

I have spent more than a decade in public education, working to make sure that all children succeed. As a former school and district leader, I have heard too many accounts of young people who progress through school believing that they are receiving an education that will prepare them to pursue their dreams only to find out how woefully short their true course of study has left them. And there are others who know the work they are currently focused on is not rigorous enough to accomplish their professional and personal goals. In both instances, the standards guiding these students and their teachers’ efforts did not represent true preparation for success in college, career and life.

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