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RTI & Parent-School Relationship

A collaborative relationship with your child’s teachers and others involved in his or her education makes it easier to advocate for your child. This includes developing a productive partnership with teachers, attending school meetings and asking questions about your child’s progress (including Response to Intervention, or RTI). Make sure your child knows that everyone is working as a team to ensure his or her success.

RTI & Parent-School Relationship

RTI & Parent-School Relationship




Response to Intervention—Tiers Without Tears

Response to Intervention-RTI interventionsSchools across the nation are working hard to ensure that all students are provided the best possible educational experiences during their pre-K through grade 12 years, and in doing so, are faced with enormous challenges. Even without taking into account such variables as the many dozens of language spoken by students and families and the impact of economic hardship, schools need to be increasingly effective in ensuring that all of their students, including those with learning disabilities (LD) and other obstacles to learning, have the best opportunities to succeed during their school, and be college- and career-ready upon graduation.

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Building a Good Relationship With Your Child's Teacher

Relationship with Teacher-Communication with Parents and Teachers Your child is your number one priority, and in a perfect world you could give them everything they need.But let's face it—you cannot do it alone. The best way to support your child's needs is to build and maintain a strong, positive relationship with all the people at school who play a role in educating your child. And, make sure your child knows that this is a team effort—you're all working together to help him or her succeed!

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How Older Kids Can Improve Their Writing Skills

Improving Writing Skills-How to Improve Your Writing You know, it’s interesting that here in California—and my reading of studies from around the country suggests that this is relatively consistent—we find across the board, whether students are doing pretty well or not so well, that they’re usually doing better in reading than they are in writing. So we find that this is kind of a generic issue. That in general, our students, our young people are not writing as well as they should be or could be.

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A Parent's Perspective—Tips for School Meetings

Parent Teacher Conference-Parent Teacher Meeting I am the father of two special needs children. My older child has a smorgasbord of attributes that interfere with learning, including emotional, behavioral and specific learning disabilities. I have specially designed armor I wear when attending any school meeting for him. I am also an educational advocate for foster children, attending intervention meetings almost daily.

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Response to Intervention—A Primer for Parents

response-to-intervention-mother-helps-son-with-workResponse to Intervention (RTI) is not a new idea. In fact, features of this approach to teaching have been around for more than 20 years under names like Teacher Assistance Team Model, Pre-Referral Intervention Model, Mainstream Assistance Team Model, School-Based Consultation Team Model, and Multi-Tier Problem-Solving Model. Simply stated, RTI is an approach to instruction that combines the art and science of teaching, allows for (and encourages) creativity and innovation, and is solidly grounded in data-based decision-making (a very good thing!).

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Questions Parents Should Ask About RTI

Response to Intervention-RTI Interventions

  • Is the school using Response to Intervention (RTI) to provide extra help to struggling students?
  • How does the school determine that all students are receiving high-quality instruction?
  • (If large numbers of students are not making acceptable progress, the instructional program should be examined.)
  • How will the school provide parents with information about the specific RTI process being used?
  • What information about RTI has the school, school district or state provided for parents?
  • Will all parents be notified of their child's screening results?

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Enhanced Communication as a Key to Success

Relationship with Teacher-Communication with Parents and Teachers

Communication between parents and educators is a good thing—no one would argue that. When families and schools share their expectations, their values about learning and behavior, and their views on roles and responsibilities, students learn more and both parents and school personnel feel supported and appreciated. The positive feelings and mutual trust that result should not be underestimated, as they are ingredients to success for students, especially those who struggle with learning.

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Communicating With Your Child's School

relationship-with-teacher-mother-on-phone If you have a child who is receiving special education services, you're more than likely to be very involved with your child's school and teacher—including planning, reviewing, and assessing your child's educational program. Over time, you will learn a lot about the special education process and how to communicate and negotiate on your child's behalf. While your knowledge, skill, and confidence will naturally increase, there are some specific communication skills that can help you be most successful in developing and maintaining a strong partnership with your child's school. We hope these "Steps to Success" will be particularly helpful to parents who are new to the special education process.

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Back-to-School: Four Sticky Situations…and How to Handle Them

teaching-dyslexia-boy-stands-at-chalkboardYou and your child are gearing up for (or have just started) the new school year, and it’s probably an exciting but somewhat anxiety-ridden time for both of you. Rest assured that this is true for most families dealing with the challenges of LD. Certain scenarios can create unusually sticky situations, but you can navigate them if you’re armed with knowledge, a proactive spirit and a can-do attitude. Here are some examples of sticky situations as well as steps you can take to create a better outcome for your child.

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A Parent's Perspective—Tips for School Meetings (audio)

about learning disabilities–students with disabilitiesIn this Parent Perspective, Jody, the father of two special needs children (both of which have emotional, behavioral and specific learning disabilities), shares tips on how to participate successfully in school meetings.

As an educational advocate for foster children, he regularly attends intervention meetings, and has had a great deal of experience with the public school system.

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A Parent’s Guide to Progress Monitoring at Home

special-needs-stories-mother-and-son-looking-at-computerWith increasing frequency, schools across the country are using a Response-to-Intervention (RTI) or multi-tiered system of instructional support. These instructional approaches rely on the use of progress monitoring tools to determine whether children are making adequate progress. Progress monitoring allows us to determine much sooner which children are at risk for not meeting grade-level targets, allows us to determine whether children receiving intervention support are making adequate progress, and allows us to more closely match the instructional support to the needs of the individual child based on his response.

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Competency-Based Education and Students With Learning and Attention Issues

competency-based-education-students-learning-attention-issuesCompetency-Based Education (CBE) is a system of personalized learning where students master specific knowledge and skills at their own pace. Over 30 states are implementing or exploring CBE. However, there isn’t a lot of guidance on how to best meet the needs of students with learning and attention issues when implementing frameworks like CBE.

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What Is PBIS? How Will It Help My Child and Improve School Discipline?

What Is PBIS? | Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS)School discipline is a big concern for parents of students with learning and attention issues. As recent guidelines from the Department of Education point out, schools are suspending minority students and students with disabilities at unreasonably high rates. But how can people change school discipline for the better? One promising framework is called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). Here, Professor George Sugai of the Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationwide initiative, answers questions parents may have about PBIS and how it can be used in schools to improve discipline policies and school climate.

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Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM): Frequently Asked Questions

curriculum-based-measurement-faqEvery profession has its fair share of jargon and the world of education is no exception. Conversations about educational practice are peppered with acronyms such as IDEA, RTI, MTSS, and CBM, all of which are important, but its not surprising that parents (and others) feel bombarded by unfamiliar terms and have trouble “connecting the dots” and understanding how these terms contribute to the ways that decisions are made to ensure that students with LD are provided the instruction and support they need to be successful in school.

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Infographic: Competency-Based Education

Competency-Based Education | Infographic & RecommendationsCompetency-Based Education (CBE) is a system of personalized learning where students master specific knowledge and skills at their own pace.

We've created an infographic and detailed policy recommendations to help policymakers, school leaders and other educators consider the unique needs of students with learning and attention issues when designing and implementing systems like CBE.

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