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Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia refers to a wide range of lifelong learning disabilities involving math. There is no single type of math disability. Dyscalculia can vary from person to person, and it affects people differently at different stages of life. Work-around strategies and accommodations help lessen the obstacles that dyscalculia presents. And just like in the area of reading, math LD is not a prescription for failure.

What is Dyscalculia - Mathematics Disability


Dyscalculia


Six Important Facts to Know About Math Learning Disabilities

Math Learning Disability in ChildrenBusy parents need fast facts and tips to help their children succeed. If your child struggles with math or has been identified with a learning disability (LD) in math, called “dyscalculia,” you want to know what it means and what you can do to help your child succeed. Here are the top-level findings based on several expert-hosted LD Talks that covered this subject.

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Common Warning Signs of Dyscalculia in Children in Grades 3–8

Math Learning Disability - Dyscalculia Warning SignsDyscalculia refers to a range of learning disabilities involving math. Dyscalculia affects people in different ways and may even vary over a person’s lifetime. Are you concerned that your child is struggling with math and math concepts? If so, the following list of common warning signs of dyscalculia in children in Grades 3–8 may help clarify your concerns.

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Dyscalculia: The Importance of Mathematics in the LD Equation

Research about Mathematics - Math Learning DisabilitiesWhen children who struggle with learning are the topic of conversation, the spotlight is most often turned to reading. And with good reason. Trouble with reading is by far the most prevalent characteristic of specific learning disabilities (LD). That said, math is not far behind, and it is not unusual for individuals with LD to have trouble in both of these areas of learning and performance.

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Common Warning Signs of Dyscalculia in Children in Grades 9–12

Math Learning Disability Symptoms in TeensHas your teenager always struggled—in one way or another—with math and spatial concepts? Has math become an even greater challenge in high school? Dyscalculia refers to a range of learning disabilities involving math. Whether your teen’s math struggles have existed in some form over time or if they’ve suddenly become more prominent, you may want to review the following list of common warning signs of dyscalculia in high school students.

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How Teachers and Parents Can Help Elementary Students With Math LD

math learning disabilities - dyscalculia helpAs I explained in an earlier post, elementary school students who are at risk for mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) often have trouble with even the most basic number processing skills. The good news is that researchers are developing remedial approaches to helping these children early on, and some relatively simple strategies are available for parents to assist their children in developing and practicing fundamental math skills.

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Making Sense of Number Sense: Understanding Dyscalculia (LD in Math)

Math Learning Disability - DyscalculiaSome people are just better at math than others! And just like with other types of learning disabilities (LD), there is no precise “cut off” for when someone might qualify as having a learning disability in math. In addition (no pun intended) not all features of a math disability persist over time or remain problematic (at the same magnitude); newly acquired skills, practiced over time, make future learning easier and more “automatic.” That said, the deficits underlying LD in math often do not go away. Work-around strategies and accommodations help, and just like in the area of reading, math LD is not a prescription for failure.

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Math LD: Identifying Basic Number Processing Difficulties

Math Learning Disability – DyscalculiaMany elementary and middle school students find math challenging, but an estimated 5 to 9% experience difficulties severe enough to be categorized as having a mathematical learning disability (MLD). An emerging consensus, at least among researchers, is that such students must exhibit comparatively poor performance on a standardized mathematics achievement test (at or below the 10th percentile) over at least a successive two-year period to be properly identified as having MLD (also known as dyscalculia). As a consequence, children who meet such criteria are typically not identified prior to first grade.

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