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Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is a learning disability that affects writing, which requires a complex set of motor and information processing skills. It can lead to problems with spelling, poor handwriting and putting thoughts on paper. People with dysgraphia might have trouble organizing letters, numbers and words on a line or page.

What is Dysgraphia - Writing Disability

Dysgraphia



What Is Dysgraphia?

What Is Dysgraphia - Writing DisabilityDysgraphia is a learning disability that affects writing, which requires a complex set of motor and information processing skills. Dysgraphia makes the act of writing difficult. It can lead to problems with spelling, poor handwriting and putting thoughts on paper. People with dysgraphia can have trouble organizing letters, numbers and words on a line or page. This can result partly from:

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Seven Facts About Learning Disabilities and Written Expression

getting-organized-stack-of-pencilsMany people with learning disabilities (LD) struggle with written expression. For students with dysgraphia, the act of writing is difficult. Those with dyslexia often have serious difficulties with spelling. Also vulnerable are students who have weaknesses in areas such as vocabulary, reading and listening comprehension, word retrieval and information processing deficits. And dyspraxia—a disorder that affects fine-motor skills and often co-occurs with LD—may also impact the physical act of writing. What do parents need to know to help their child with LD succeed in writing? Here are top-level findings from experts Dr. Steve Graham and Dr. Karen Harris.

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Common Warning Signs of Dysgraphia in Children in Grades 3–8

Dysgraphia Warning Signs Dysgraphia is a learning disability that affects writing, which requires a complex set of motor and information processing skills. Is your child is having trouble with the physical act of writing or putting thoughts down on paper? If so, the following list of common warning signs of dysgraphia in children in grades 3–8 may help you to more clearly identify the specific areas of concern and seek help to address these problems.

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Common Warning Signs of Dysgraphia in Children Pre-K to Grade 2

Dysgraphia Warning SignsDoes your young child struggle with drawing and writing when other children of the same age don’t seem to have the same difficulty? Does your child often get fatigued because the physical process of writing is so arduous? Dysgraphia is a learning disability (LD) that affects writing, which requires a complex set of motor and information-processing skills.

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How to Help With Dysgraphia: FAQs Answered

Dysgraphia Accommodations FAQsWhat types of accommodations, tools and strategies can help people with dysgraphia work around their challenges with writing? When we asked our Facebook community to send us questions about dysgraphia, this was one of the top inquiries we received. The following expert answers from Sheldon H. Horowitz, EdD will help you understand how to help your child who struggles with writing.

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Common Warning Signs of Dysgraphia in College Students and Adults

Dysgraphia Warning Signs - College and AdultsHave you always had a difficult time with writing – the physical act of using a pen and pencil during writing or conveying your ideas in written formats? Or, do you know someone who might struggle with written expression? If so, you’ll want to know about a learning disability (LD) called Dysgraphia, a specific learning disability that affects writing.

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Common Warning Signs of Dysgraphia in Children in Grades 9–12

Dysgraphia Warning Signs - TeensHas your teenager always struggled with written expression? Is his or her written work messy, disorganized and incomplete? If the answer is “yes”, review the following list of common warning signs of dysgraphia in high school students. Dysgraphia is a learning disability (LD) that affects writing, which requires a complex set of motor and information-processing skills.

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On Dysgraphia: Writing About My Inability to Write

Dysgraphia: Writing About My Inability to WriteIt is often said that doctors have messy handwriting. By that logic, as a senior in high school, I should have a medical school diploma. In all fairness though, I have something that most doctors don’t have: dysgraphia. At 17, my handwriting looks like the scribbles of a 3-year-old, which is not likely to change. For much of my education, I was given occupational therapy through my IEP in an attempt to improve my penmanship. Unfortunately, the results of this endeavor were mostly unsatisfactory, only managing to improve my handwriting to the point that I can often read what I write. However, if I were to attempt to submit a handwritten paper, the comment that I would most likely get from a teacher is, “I’m not deciphering hieroglyphics.”

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