Our Team

Lindsay E. Jones, Esq.

Lindsay E. Jones, Esq.

President & CEO

Lindsay E. Jones is the President and CEO of NCLD, a national nonprofit organization that seeks to improve the lives of the 1 in 5 individuals with learning disabilities and attention issues. Lindsay has been with NCLD for over 5 years and previously served as NCLD’s Vice President, Chief Policy & Advocacy Officer. In that role, she designed and implemented NCLD’s legislative strategy in Washington, DC, aimed at advancing government policies that support the success of individuals with learning and attention issues in school, at work and in life. She also developed advocacy campaigns and worked closely with NCLD’s grassroots network of committed parents.

Before joining NCLD, Lindsay was the senior director for policy and advocacy at the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), where she led CEC’s federal legislative advocacy and worked with dedicated educator advocates across the country. She was instrumental in developing and pushing forward many policies at CEC that supported classroom teachers in their work with children with disabilities and their families.

Lindsay has a lifelong passion for education. She grew up in a family of advocates committed to working for individuals with disabilities. Prior to her national policy work, she was a partner with the law firm of Gust Rosenfeld in Phoenix. As a practicing attorney, she advised schools and families on special education compliance and litigation. Her practice included Office for Civil Rights investigations, state department of education complaints, IDEA and Section 504 due process hearings and litigation. She is admitted and has litigated before the US Supreme Court, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the federal district courts and state and administrative courts in Arizona.

Lindsay earned her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Arizona, and has a master’s degree in Latin American studies from the University of New Mexico. She lives in Virginia with her husband and son, who attends public school.

From the policy blog

New “Public Charge” Rule: The Impact on Students, Families, Schools, and Communities

Education and civil rights advocates are in agreement: Students who are immigrants and those whose parents are immigrants should not have their citizenship status jeopardized when they receive public assistance. However, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) disagrees. Just last week, DHS issued a final rule that is set to go into effect on October … Continue reading New “Public Charge” Rule: The Impact on Students, Families, Schools, and Communities

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