Our Team

Lindsay E. Jones, Esq.

Lindsay E. Jones, Esq.

Vice President, Chief Policy & Advocacy Officer

Lindsay E. Jones is the vice president, chief policy & advocacy officer for the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD). She leads a team that designs and implements NCLD’s legislative strategy in Washington, DC, aimed at advancing government policies that support the success of individuals with learning and attention issues in school, at work and in life. She also develops advocacy campaigns and works closely with NCLD’s grassroots network of committed parents.

Before joining NCLD, Lindsay was the senior director for policy and advocacy at the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), where she led CEC’s federal legislative advocacy and worked with dedicated educator advocates across the country. She was instrumental in developing and pushing forward many policies at CEC that supported classroom teachers in their work with children with disabilities and their families.

Lindsay has a lifelong passion for education. She grew up in a family of advocates committed to working for individuals with disabilities. Prior to her national policy work, she was a partner with the law firm of Gust Rosenfeld in Phoenix. As a practicing attorney, she advised schools and families on special education compliance and litigation. Her practice included Office for Civil Rights investigations, state department of education complaints, IDEA and Section 504 due process hearings and litigation. She is admitted and has litigated before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the federal district courts and state and administrative courts in Arizona.

Lindsay is a frequent speaker at professional conferences on issues of policy, advocacy and special education law. She earned her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Arizona, and has a master’s degree in Latin American studies from the University of New Mexico.

From the blog

Getting Specific About SLD: A Conversation Guide for Using Terms like Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, and Dysgraphia

Clear and effective communication between parents, educators, and other school professionals is critical to identifying and meeting the needs of students with specific learning disabilities (SLD). But sometimes, confusion over specific terms like dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia can lead to unnecessary tension or conflict between members of a student’s IEP team. And there may be … Continue reading Getting Specific About SLD: A Conversation Guide for Using Terms like Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, and Dysgraphia

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